Cincinnati Dentures and Partial Dentures

Dentures and Partial Dentures Cincinnati, OH

When it comes to lost teeth, there are many practical replacement options to restore one's smile. Missing teeth are not just a question of appearance; they also affect the health of the remaining teeth as well as everyday comfort. Dentures and partial dentures are popular tooth replacement options that are customized for an optimal fit.

Dentures and partial dentures are available at Fred H. Peck, DDS, FAACD in Cincinnati and the surrounding area. We use high-quality materials and advanced fitting techniques to support your comfort and dental health. With our help, you can select the type of denture that will work for you.

Get in touch today by calling us at 513-657-1047 to discuss how dentures can improve your quality of life.

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Reasons to Get Dentures

While there are other options available, there are several reasons that so many people turn to dentures:

  • Denture may be an affordable solution to tooth loss. Other tooth replacement options tend to cost more, contingent upon the insurance provider. Traditional full dentures and partial dentures are typically more cost-efficient than alternatives. This is true even when factoring in the cost of replacing the dentures every 5-10 years.
  • Lower risk associated with denture procedure. The patient prefers to avoid the potentially painful failure risk associated with bridges. Dental implants also require more invasive surgery, by nature making them riskier. Age and potential bone loss can increase risk.
  • Denture can be received relatively quickly. Dentures typically take less time to receive than implants. Dental implants may take a year or more to complete. Healing periods between steps may last for up to six months.

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How Dentures Are Made

Dentures consist of a flesh-colored base and the synthetic teeth attached to it. Today, both components are made of a type of acrylic. The artificial teeth are typically made of acrylic resin, which closely approximates the appearance of real teeth.

Once the decision is made to proceed with dentures, the patient will make an appointment for the impression. The dentist will put a tray with a thick paste into the patient's mouth to take impressions of the upper and lower teeth. This process usually takes about 20 seconds for each impression. The dentist may offer to apply a numbing agent to the palate beforehand to minimize discomfort.

Afterward, the impressions are used to make a plaster model of the mouth. The dental lab technician then uses wax to attach the teeth. The wax is shaped and trimmed according to the patient's gum shape.

Then the wax shape with attached teeth is placed in a container, sometimes called a flask. Dental stone or plaster is poured around to hold it. The wax is then boiled out, leaving a molding in the shape of the gums, and the acrylic material for the dentures' base is poured in.

The denture is removed from the container, trimmed and polished. At this point, the patient will have the first fitting. While some people may find their dentures fit properly right away, most need to have a few adjustments done for optimal comfort.

It is normal to need several fitting appointments before the dentures fit the way they should. Patients should not hesitate to let the dentist know if something feels wrong. What may seem like a trivial amount of discomfort during fitting can seriously interfere with your quality of life, later on, so be sure to speak up.

Types of Dentures

There are several basic types of dentures. The right option for you can depend on several factors, which Fred H. Peck, DDS, FAACD can discuss with you. Choosing an option that works for you can help you get the most out of the dentures.

Dentures can be full or partial. A full set can be necessary for patients who are missing all their teeth. In this case, impressions will be taken of the gums and the teeth made to maintain the proportions and distances similar to the real teeth. A partial set can be an option if the patient still has several teeth in good condition remaining.

Additionally, there are also fully removable and bridge-supported dentures. Removable dentures are what most people picture: the base that sits on the gums with attached teeth. They can be easily taken out. While this option is typically more affordable, removable dentures may need several adjustments over the years as the mouth's shape changes.

Bridge-supported dentures are also removable but do not have a base. They are clipped on to four or six dental implants. These implants are small titanium posts that are surgically inserted into the jawbone. Eventually, the implants fuse with the bone.

Due to the implants, bridge-supported dentures tend to be more costly than other options. They also involve minor surgery. However, many people find they feel more secure and are more comfortable because they do not need a base. The implant procedure can also reduce future bone loss, which can be familiar with missing teeth.

Not all patients are good candidates for fixed dentures. Those who already suffer extensive bone loss may not have enough bone to support the implants. Some other health concerns can also prevent implants from being a good option.

Main Teeth Replacement Options

There are several options that patients can choose from when it comes to teeth replacement. Some people may rely on more than one, depending on the situation.

1. Implants

This option is the most permanent, having the potential to go without a replacement. It requires several visits, time for healing, and may take a year to complete. The process involves placing an implant into the bone structure of the jaw, where it should sit permanently. The dentist then places a crown over the implant for a realistic look. Most patients can then use the tooth immediately.

2. Bridges

An often-faster option and, depending on insurance, more cost-conscious option is to get bridges. However, unlike implants, these typically need replacement every five to ten years. With exceptional care, some people extend that lifespan to about 15 years. Bridges involve cementing an artificial tooth into the available gap and securing it to the natural teeth or implants on both or either side. This procedure typically takes about two visits to complete and may include a crown.

3. Dentures

Patients may choose to get either full or partial dentures, depending on the extent of tooth loss. Most types of dentures are removable. If a person still has natural teeth, the dentist must note the color of the teeth and gums. That way, the doctor can ensure the coating of the dentures match the natural teeth, especially if the teeth are visible.

Care and Maintenance of the Dentures

Though dentures are durable and help the patient once again bite into food, these appliances can break. Dentures can also warp or get dirty, so it is vital that people follow proper maintenance guidelines, as described in this article on the American Dental Association website. Our team at Fred H. Peck, DDS, FAACD will counsel each patient on proper care to extend the life of their dentures. Though, ultimately, it is up to the patient to be diligent in routine care and contacting the dentist when problems arise.

After eating a meal, a patient should remove their dentures and rinse the appliance thoroughly with water, removing excess food. Also, patients should brush the dentures with a soft toothbrush and non-abrasive toothpaste. When it is time to retire for the night, the person should remove the dentures. Some denture wearers soak their dentures in a solution. You may contact our team to see if a denture solution is recommended for your care routine.

What to Do in Case of Breakage

There are plenty of ways to repair your dentures in the event of an accident. It is almost inevitable that patients will find a crack or break in the appliance at some point. The base could crack, or a tooth could break loose. For a quick fix, there are products available online and at most local grocery stores and pharmacies, such as D.O.C.® Repair-It®, Cushion Grip®, and Perk ®'s Denture Repair Kit. If you are considering using a product for a temporary fix, please contact your dental office first. Whenever significant damage occurs, like a large crack across the base, you should seek medical treatment.

In any case of breakage, the denture-wearer should contact our office right away. Our team has the right tools and equipment to fix the dentures properly. Patients can feel good that our dental professionals will carefully examine the damage and repair it. If necessary, the dentist may have to replace the dentures altogether.

Avoiding Problems

While some situations may be challenging to prevent, patients can minimize repair needs. People with dentures should be careful with certain hard foods such as nuts, popcorn kernels, ice, and candy. Some sticky foods may also pull out the dentures. When cleaning the appliance, the individual should place a towel or cloth on the counter or in the sink in case the dentures fall. Denture-wearers who play sports should wear a mouthguard to protect the dentures.

Common Misunderstandings About Dentures

There are many benefits and advantages to getting dentures. However, some prospective patients shy away from seeking this treatment because of myths and other false information. Some people do not know enough about dentures and how this treatment can benefit their oral health and the appearance of their face.

People often believe that dentures are the last resort when all other options have failed. The fact is that dentures are not nearly as invasive as other treatment options. Wearing dentures can preserve mouth function as well as any other option.

Another misconception is that it is easy to spot a pair of dentures in a person’s mouth. Dentures are natural-looking in the base with artificial teeth. We can help ensure that dentures or partial dentures blend in with the surrounding teeth. Also, while dentures can fall out at inopportune times, our dentist can suggest adhesive products to hold the appliance in place.

Definition of Denture Terminology
Alveolar Bone
The alveolar bone is the bone surrounding the root of the tooth that keeps the tooth in place.
Clasp
A clasp is a device that holds a removable partial denture prosthesis to the teeth.
Denture Base
The denture base is the part of the denture that connects the artificial teeth with the soft tissue of the gums.
Edentulous
Edentulous is a term that applies to people who do not have any teeth.
Periodontal Disease
Periodontal disease is a condition that causes inflammation of the gingival tissues and membrane of the teeth, leading to tooth loss without professional treatment.
Pontic
Pontic is another term for an artificial tooth on a fixed partial denture.
Rebase
Rebase is the process of refitting denture prosthesis by replacing the base material.
Reline
Reline is when a professional resurfaces the surface of the prosthesis with a new base material.
Resin/Acrylic
Resin and Acrylic are resinous materials that can be components in a denture base.
Stomatitis
Stomatitis is the inflammation of the tissue that is underlying a denture that does not fit properly. It can also result from other oral health factors.

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